Treatments

View a range of all foot treatments we provide below.

Achilles Pain
Athlete’s foot
Ankle sprains
Arch Pain
Arthritis
Biomechanical and Gait assessment
Bunion Pain
Burning Feet
Chilblains
Corns and Callus
Cracked Heels and dry skin
Diabetic Assessments
Discolored Nails
Disorders of the Nail
Fungal Nails
Footwear Assessment
Flat Feet
Foot Blisters
Hammer Toes
Hard Skin
Heel Pain
High Arch
Ingrown Toenail
Metatarsalgia
Neuroma Pain Morton
Pronation
Shin Pain
Smelly Feet
Thickened Nails
Verruca

 

 

Treatment Information:

Achilles Pain – This is often caused by walking excessively on the outside of the foot, leading to an inflamed Achilles tendon. Can be treated using specially fitted insoles to correct this movement.

Athlete’s Foot – A fungal infection of the skin often seen inbetween the toes. Can be a result of sweaty feet or feet exposed to moisture which are not dried properly. This is treated with anti-fungal agents and effectively drying and airing the feet. Symptoms often include itchy, dry or moist lesions. If left untreated, it can also lead to fungal infections of the nail.

Ankle Sprains – Caused by twisting the soft tissues and ligaments that surround the ankle joint. This is treated using laser therapy to increase the circulation to the affected area. If this is a recurring event, it can be treated by stabilising the joint with insoles.

Arch Pain or Heel Pain – In most cases, this is plantar fasciitis, (when the sole of the foot becomes inflamed, often due to people with flat feet who pronate, or roll inwards on their feet as they walk).

Arthritis – A destructive inflammatory condition of the joints due to wear and tear. Usually diagnosed through blood tests via your GP. Painful symptoms can be treated using acupuncture, laser therapy and supportive insoles.

Biomechanical and Gait Assessment – This is an examination of the movements and structure of the foot and lower limb, helping to understand the cause and treatment for various foot and lower limb conditions. Footwear advice may be needed as well as specialist orthotics to prevent or treat any structural or biomechanical abnormalities.

Bunion Pain – This is one of the most common forefoot deformities usually as a result of excessive force to the 1st toe joint caused by flat feet. As the toe moves towards the smaller toes the joint becomes enlarged. Shoes without adequate width can cause calluses, corns and pain. Wider fitting shoes help to reduce the friction on the skin whilst specialist insoles with arch supports help to prevent bunions from occurring.

Burning Feet – Some of the possible causes for burning feet are: diabetes, chilblains and athlete’s foot

Chilblains – Are small itchy, red (and sometimes purple) swellings on the skin, which can become increasingly painful, can swell and then dry out leaving cracks in the skin which expose the foot to the risk of infection. They occur on the toes (particularly the smaller ones).
If you have developed chilblains do not scratch them, instead use soothing lotions such as witch hazel and calamine to take away most of the discomfort.
If the chilblain has ulcerated, apply an antiseptic dressing. If you have diabetes or are undergoing medical treatment, do have the ulcer assessed by your GP or Podiatrist.

Corns and Calluses – This thickening of the skin is due to excessive pressure or prolonged loading particularly on bony areas on the foot. Corns have the same make up as calluses but have a nucleus or centre. Calluses and corns are removed with a scalpel by a Podiatrist. Creams with a high urea content, such as CCS help to exfoliate the calluses and specialist insoles help to offload areas of high pressure. Foot files are also a safe and useful way of removing calluses.

Cracked Heels and Dry Skin – Cracked heels are usually caused by dry skin although excessively moist skin can also cause fissures. If not treated the dry and hard skin can lead to fissures or cracks which can become painful, possibly leading to infection.

Diabetic Assessments – Patients diagnosed by their GP with diabetes should have an annual foot screen according to national guidelines. The Podiatrist will assess the condition of your feet by checking for complications such as corns and calluses and offering advice on how to care for your feet. The assessment also involves examining the sensation (neurological condition) and circulation of the lower limb. This is to help prevent ulcers and infections, a complication of diabetes, which can lead to more serious conditions. If minor wounds do not begin to heal within a few days you should see your GP.

Discolored Nails – This is commonly caused by fungal infections which appear yellow in colour. Less commonly, other colours can present on the nailbed which can be a result of underlying health conditions.

Disorders of the Nail – Brittle, crumbly nails, discoloured nails, thickened nails, loose nails, spoon shaped nails, pitting or dented nails, transverse white lines across the nails, dark stripes running down the nail.

Flat Feet – Most people have a gap under the sole of the foot as they stand. The size of this gap varies. As people with flat feet walk, the arch flattens and the foot rolls inwards. This is called pronation. This can lead to damage to the ankle joint and Achille’s tendon and pain to the inner ankle, arch of the foot, heel, calf muscle, knee, hips and the lower back. Specially fitted orthotics with an arch support are used to treat these symptoms.

Footwear Assessment – Correctly fitting shoes can prevent many common foot conditions including corns, calluses, cracked heels, symptomatic bunions, ingrown toe nails and athlete’s foot. Proper fitting shoes also help to support the structure of the foot which in turn can prevent and reduce muscular and joint pain of the foot and lower limb. Therefore it is advisable to see a Podiatrist to examine your feet and give advice on suitable footwear.

Foot Blisters – Usually occur due to friction in moist warm conditions. Proper padding to reduce friction and to reduce hyperhydrosis will help prevent blisters

Fungal Nails – Can often look yellow, white, black or green and are most commonly caused by athlete’s foot which is a fungal infection of the skin and can transfer to the nail. Oral medication may be prescribed by your GP.  Due to some side effects, it may be advisable to first use a topical treatment supplied by your Podiatrist.  You should start to see a new nail growing from the base of the nail as the treatment takes effect.

Hammer Toes – These can often be confused with other toe abnormalities such as claw toes, mallet toes and trigger toes. A hammer toe is where the toe retracts or bends at the first and second phalange joint which can lead to corns or calluses forming on the tip or top of that toe. Calluses and corns are removed with a scalpel by a Podiatrist. Creams with high urea content in them such as CCS help to exfoliate the callus whilst specialist orthotics and toe props help to offload areas of high pressure. Foot files are also a safe and useful way of removing calluses.

Hard Skin or Calluses – This thickening of the skin is due to excessive pressure or prolonged loading particularly on bony areas on the foot. Corns have the same make up as calluses but have a nucleus or centre. Calluses and corns are removed with a scalpel by a Podiatrist. Creams with high urea content such as CCS help to exfoliate calluses whilst specialist orthotics help to offload areas of high pressure. Foot files are also a safe and useful way of removing calluses.

Heel Pain – In most cases, this is plantar fasciitis, (when the sole of the foot becomes inflamed, often due to people with flat feet who pronate, or roll inwards on their feet as they walk).

High Arch – Most people have a gap under the sole of the foot as they stand. The size of this gap varies.  People with high arches tend to walk on the outside of their foot. Wear marks can be seen on the outside of the soles of shoes. This may lead to recurrent ankle sprains, excess calluses, corns and displacement of the fibro fatty pad underneath the balls of the feet. This can be treated with specialist orthotics, offloading the pressure from the lateral side of the foot to the medial side.

Ingrown Toenails – An ingrown toenail can be due to damage, shape or poor cutting of the nail, usually the big toe. This is when the nail or spike of the nail causes excessive pressure on the skin, even breaking the skin which can lead to infection.

Metatarsalgia – This refers to pain in the ball of the foot, sometimes a shooting, burning or aching pain that can lead to numbness in the toes. It ranges in severity, sometimes affecting just one or two toes and other times affecting the whole foot or both feet. There are a number of reasons why this might happen including poorly fitted shoes, arthritis or obesity. To treat this condition, shock absorbing insoles are used as well as non steroidal anti-inflammatory pain killers. If this does not relieve the pain, steroid injections can be given.

Morton’s Neuroma – Neuroma is where the nerve, usually between the 3rd and 4th metatarsal bones, is compressed or irritated. This condition can be conservatively treated with specialist orthotics, which separate the metatarsals, reducing this compression and irritation until the inflammation reduces and the pain also.

Pronation – (see Flat Feet) This is a type of movement that occurs with people who have flat feet. Specialist orthotics help to control this movement thus preventing and treating the symptoms of pronation such as damage to the ankle joint and Achille’s tendon and pain to the inner ankle, arch of the foot, heel, calf muscle, knee, hips and the lower back.

Shin Pain – This is often related to flat feet where the foot, whilst weight bearing, rolls inwards or pronates, resulting in excessive force on the ligament that attaches to the shin. This causes inflammation and thus creates pain. In most cases, rest is required, however specialist orthotics can help to prevent the excess force on the shin (see Flat Feet).

Smelly Feet – Because there are more sweat glands in your feet than in any other part of your body, foot odour is a common problem. As sweat decomposes, it creates a foul smelling odour, more common in pregnant women, those who suffer with hyperhydrosis (excessive sweating), people under stress and people taking certain medications. There are several ways to treat foot odour including the use of anti-bacterial scrub and wearing medicated insoles.

Thickened Nails – Can be a result of damage and trauma to the nail and nail bed. Fungal infections can also cause the nail to thicken as can psoriasis, reactive arthritis and other conditions.

Verruca – This is a virus called the human papillomavirus that causes an abnormal growth of the epidermis/skin causing a lump. It is very contagious and can be transferred from one person to another through direct or indirect contact. 60% of verrucas can go within two years without treatment, however many can take longer and therefore treatments such as cryotherapy, salicylic acid and other chemical and pain-free laser therapy can all help to fight the virus.